Ophthalmology

I wrote a while ago about a rather upsetting visit to the gp’s surgery, which you can read about here. I haven’t updated you all since through my blog, if you follow me on The Myasthenia Kid Facebook page then you will know about this. So I apologise for going over old ground in the next few paragraphs but after that it’s all new, I promise.

So to provide you with some context back in July I saw a trainee gp or as I like to call them a 12 year old with attitude. They were terribly dismissive of my dry eyes, they looked at the Clinical Commissioning Groups dry eye pathway – so what drugs they are “allowed” to prescribe. They tried to palm me off with stuff that came under mild dry eyes and this was after I had the first corneal abrasion. So I had to point out that a corneal abrasion didn’t suggest a mild dry eye problem. So I was given more day time drops but no help at all for the night time ointment that I am allergic to. I got a shoulder shrug and was shoved out the door. Just a quick update though finally after waiting since July I now have an appointment for the Ultrasound that they were supposed to request……for the 10th October! Glad it is nothing serious eh?

So fast forward and blog readers only, this is where you will find out that exactly 4 weeks after the first corneal abrasion, I got another one. So I made a doctors appointment for the 27th August. I attended the appointment filled with hope as this would be with my gp, who had more experience and didn’t feel like they had anything to prove. Unfortunately that was not the case. I explained to the gp that I had suffered 2 corneal abrasions in the last 4 weeks, that I am allergic to three brands of the night time ointment that I had tried . I attempted to show them these photos to show how bad the reaction was but I was told quite firmly “I believe you”

It soon became clear though that they really didn’t believe me. They asked if I was allergic to Lacrilube which I told them I had used it in the past with no issues, however there is a national shortage of it in the UK, I was using the NHS suggested replacement and I was allergic to that. They then decided, despite the computer flashing up that there was a national shortage of this drug when they tried to prescribe it to ring the local pharmacy to see if they had it stock. I could hardly contain myself when I heard the pharmacist tell them loud and clear there is a national shortage of the medication. They then proceeded to tell me that she would prescribe me more of the ointment I was allergic too and if I didn’t want to use that perhaps I could get up 3 to 4 times a night to put my day time drops in.

I will admit to getting rather cross at this point and asked at what point would they consider repeated corneal abrasions serious enough for me to be referred to the Ophthalmologist? I pointed out that I have a connective tissue disorder Ehlers Danlos Syndrome and that eyes are made of collagen. I challenged them to explain why putting my sight at risk was acceptable as due to having EDS I was at risk of scarring. I was really angry, so angry I would have cried if I could produce the tears. My voice was shaking. They then said “you seem angry”. What is this naming feelings shit? It doesn’t make me calmer it makes me more angry, I am not a child who can’t identify what I am feeling. I got crosser and replied “Yes I am angry. I am angry that after two corneal abrasions and two gp appointments I am still being fobbed off.” They interrupted and said “I am not fobbing you off but the Ophthalmology department won’t see you whilst you are taking morphine as that will dry your eyes out.” I pointed out that I was diagnosed with dry eyes at least 5 years before I started taking morphine and I found it highly unlikely that morphine would now suddenly be making my eyes much drier than they had been for the last 14 or so years. 

To cut a long story short I had to demand to be referred to an ophthalmologist as they had tried all the eye medications open to them as a gp and now I needed a specialists in put. To pacify me I am sure she told me she would speak to the ophthalmologists and see if they would accept a referral. The attitude of this doctor to essentially prevent me from seeing a specialist when it was clear that my eyes were severely dry and causing corneal abrasions because my eyelids are sticking to my eyeballs overnight really upset me. Like I said earlier if I could have cried I would have done. I am so sick of everything being a battle and I am seriously worried for patients if they have conditions that need a consultants input that referrals are being barred for no other reason than financial. That is wrong on so many levels and against the hippocratic oath.

Funnily enough less than a week later I got a letter through to book an appointment with the Eye Hospital. Look at that, they did want to see me, even if I was on medication that could make the dry eyes worse. The fact that my letter came through so quickly made me even angrier because it was even clearer that this was about finances not what was best for the patient.

So today ( Tuesday 24th ) I went to the eye hospital. I attended by myself on my mobility scooter as on the letter it stated I could be there up to three hours doing tests before I got to see a consultant / registrar. That was way too long to expect Dembe to work as he is only 10 months and I won’t put him in situations that would be too much for him for fear of putting him off due to bad experiences. So Jay dropped me off and headed back home. 

As usual whomever designs hospital waiting rooms seemed to have failed to grasp that some patients will need mobility aids such as frames, rollators, wheelchairs and scooters. The chairs were crammed together with no space for anyone using a wheelchair or scooter to get themselves into and out of that area safely. This total lack of awareness in a fucking hospital of all places really grinds my gears. This place should be the gold fucking standard of accessibility as surely the disabled are the ones who are going to be using this resource more than the rest of the population. Come on people its 2019 and we are still treating the disabled as an inconvenience or invisible.

I digress. I managed to find a spot for me to occupy that wouldn’t cause an obstruction. I was worried as many people attending the clinic are legally blind, so I checked with the nursing staff that I was ok. I had a quick vision test reading letters off a board  and then I was back in the waiting room. I would be called into consulting room 7, 8 or 9. I was called in reasonably quickly by a young lady doctor. She was exceptionally polite and courteous. I won’t lie I was terrified all of yesterday and this morning that they were going to treat me like a time waster and tell me I would have to come off morphine before they would treat me. After all this is more or less what the gp had suggested. This couldn’t have been any further from the truth.

The doctor was very concerned to learn that I have been suffering from minor corneal abrasions for a year before having the two within 4 weeks. Fingers crossed I have managed to avoid one since 10th August – I know I have probably just jinxed myself. She asked me what ointments I had tried at night to lubricate my eyes and attempt to prevent the abrasions. So I brought out the three tubes. I then said I am allergic to all three, so she asked me to tell her the symptoms. Thankfully in the waiting room I had the presence of mind to screenshot my photos from August so they were the first photos on my phone and I didn’t have to spend an age scrolling – I take a lot of photos. She was quite shocked at the level of swelling. I let her know it isn’t just swelling but the skin burns and itches. She said to me that I shouldn’t use the ointments with that level of reaction to them. Which left me wondering why my gp had issued me with another prescription for one of them? Had they bothered to look at my photos maybe they would have accepted how bad the reaction was. How I have got away with no abrasions since August I have no idea as at best I have probably used the ointments 2 to 3 times a week. As the swelling is crazy after one application and takes a couple of days to go down.

We then went through my day time routine with my eyes and the medications being used, plus my symptoms. I am pretty sure that the gp had stated that I had watery eyes due to dry eyes, which as weird as that sounds is a symptom that some people have with the condition. I never have. I used to have eyes that watered every time I yawned but they don’t even do that anymore. The consultant seemed genuinely surprised when I said no my eyes don’t water and she rechecked the letter she had in front of her. She was very pleased that I had taken matters into my own hands and tried different drops as it moves the situation forward ( I brought all my eye medications I use or have tried with me). She told me if I hadn’t of done this she would now have to try me on various medications to see if they worked. As this had already been done she could go straight to prescribing Ciclosporin eye drops. 

The Ciclosporin eye drops are to used instead of the night time eye ointment. She has warned me they will sting badly when applied and probably make my eyes water. If I can stick with it around 80% of people who are placed on them find they work for them. They will take 3 months to reach full effect. However she wants me back in clinic in 6 weeks as by then I should know if they are helping at all. At that clinic appointment depending on how they are working they may add steroid drops into the mix . She let me know if the Ciclosporin drops don’t work we haven’t reached the end of the of the road and there are still other things to try.

I also had a thorough eye examination. My retinas were checked, the surface of my eye was checked – I had the lovely yellow dye put in them. She flicked my eyelids up on themselves – that made me feel sick and she did it without any warning! She also prodded the bottom lid with a cotton wool bud ( Q tip ) looking at the tear production glands. She told me I have two issues. Firstly I have very dry eyes probably caused by a combination of factors my hormones – the delight of the menopause can make dry eyes worse, my medications – I dispute this as these medications I have been on for years and the dry eyes only took a turn for the worse 12 months ago. However I can’t be bothered to argue as they are treating me seriously and not fobbing me off. Thirdly your autonomic nervous system also controls your mucous membranes so it would make sense with mine being so naughty that it has a hand in this. I made it clear that I wasn’t concerned with what was causing the dryness more the fact I wanted the corneal abrasions limited if not stopped.

After the appointment I was absolutely fucked. I hadn’t realised how very stressed I was due to the gp making out that I was wasting everyone’s time. I was worried about the information the referral letter would contain . The doctor I saw today was really pleasant and thorough. I felt listened to and validated in my demands to be referred to the hospital. Ciclosporin can only be prescribed by a consultant and will mean ( if I can tolerate it) that I will need to attend the eye clinic every 6 months. However after two corneal abrasions it should never have needed me getting so angry to push the gp to do this. Especially when they weren’t offering me any way to limit or prevent the corneal abrasions. I do worry for other patients all over the UK who have real issues that need consultant level intervention who are being denied access to them. I thank god that I stood my ground and got my referral.

Just for a few giggles – I went through the entire hospital and hospital grounds on my mobility scooter completely unaware that my face was stained with the yellow dye they had used on my eyes. No wonder I was getting a few strange looks!

It was worse than this, it was only because I had wiped my eyes I realised!

Ehlers Danlos Syndrome and how it affects me

I first published this post in May 2014 for Ehlers Danlos awareness month, as it’s that time again I thought I would share for those new to my blog.

As May is Ehlers Danlos Syndrome Awareness month I thought I would share with you how my bendy body affects me and take some photographs to show you how bendy I am. Now I am well aware that as an Edser I am not supposed to perform “Party Tricks” every doctor I see tells me that after they’ve asked me to show them! The moves I have photographed cause me no pain – I wouldn’t be that stupid to suffer so much for my art!

For those of you unaware of what Ehlers Danlos syndrome is or that are new to it I am going to give you a brief and basic overview. EDS is an inherited connective tissue disorder, affecting the collagen protein in the body. Connective tissue is the “glue” that holds the body together, it connects tendons and muscles to the bones and holds organs in place. Collagen is what makes this glue and in EDS, its a bit defective. Our connective tissue is super stretchy and lax so it means that our joints aren’t held in place properly. Our joints have an unusual range of motion – so in normal people your joints will only move to a certain point. In EDS ours move to that point and beyond – the photo below is of my fingers which are hypermobile.

If you don’t have EDS you will recognise that my fingers should not be able to move this far. I have seen a video of a lady with EDS pull her fingers so far back that they touch her wrist. Thankfully mine don’t move that much.

It is important to remember that EDS is a syndrome ( syndrome means a collection of symptoms) so it affects people differently. You may know someone who is double jointed or extremely flexible ( and probably not diagnosed with EDS) they may when having a look at the beighton diagnostic criteria clearly have EDS but have no pain or any other of the associated symptoms. Where as I have constant pain and joints that like to sublux ( partially dislocate) or dislocate on a daily basis. Also some people find that they have joints that are very unstable (sublux or dislocate) and other joints that are fine and actually normal. My elbows joints are normal and not hypermobile and although I can do this (see photo below) with my thumbs the rest of my thumb joint is stable.

My doctors have classed my EDS as type 3 or Hypermobility, ( there are a few different types of EDS) I was diagnosed by a rheumatologist who I paid to see privately. Getting a diagnosis was one of the few things that my GP and I have ever disagreed on, he felt I didn’t need it I said that I did. Since I have got the diagnosis it has changed the management of my pain, my dental treatment and provided some much needed answers as to why I have had pain from such a long age. I was still being told I had growing pains at 26 when I visited a gp for my leg pain! You maybe wondering why my dental treatment changed after my diagnosis well with EDS we are more prone to periodontal disease (gum disease) and also we have a problem with all local anaesthetics. For some of us local anaesthetics don’t work at all for others, like me we burn through locals really quickly. My dentist also has to give me a local anaesthetic that doesn’t contain adrenaline. Due to my autonomic dysfunction adrenaline causes me to have tachycardia and that in turn can cause me to faint when getting up from the dentists chair – which I have done.

The worst area of my body affected is my spine which is very hypermobile from the back of my skull to my coccyx (tailbone) those little vertebrae rarely like to stay in place. My neck is hypermobile and I have what’s known as “owl neck” so I can move it not all the way around but too far on both sides. I also found out by chatting to someone on twitter that doing (see photo below) is not normal. You see thats the thing with EDS we have no idea what the normal range of motion is for a body part as we have never experienced normal.

I have four discs at the base of my back that I can’t even touch with my fingers without me flying through the air. I never have a day without some sort of back issue – muscles going into spasm, discs being naughty by locking up so I can’t stand up you name it my back can do it. You may have heard me mention before how I have to go to bed really early its because by around 5pm I am struggling to hold my head up and my back is starting to resemble the letter ‘C’. My muscles work hard all day trying to support me and by 5pm they are worn out and throw in the towel.

Although it may seem like fun that I can do all these things and I have the bonus of looking young for my age (the only good thing EDS has ever given me) life with EDS is not fine and dandy. EDS produces fatigue as our muscles have to work around 5 times harder than a normal persons every time we move. EDS is almost certainly the cause for my autonomic dysfunction its estimated around 78% of people with Ehlers Danlos Syndrome have autonomic nervous system issues.

There are currently no genetic tests for EDS Hypermobility ( other forms of EDS have genetic tests) and no cure for any type Ehlers Danlos Syndrome only treatment which consists of pain relief, physical therapy and bracing joints.

Throughout May I will be blogging about EDS to explain what its like to live with this condition.

Useful links

NHS CHoices explaining EDS and the types of EDS

Ehlers Danlos Support UK UK Charity for EDS patients and produces an excellent magazine called Fragile Links

Hypermobility / EDS and the other issues it can cause in the body– HMSA Charity (HyperMobility Syndrome Association)

Beighton Scale from the HMSA website

 

While I was getting my husband to take the pictures the dogs tried to join in. This is Mollie trying to give me a kiss!

 

 

This is me giving up as all the dogs tried to join in!

 Sunday 4th May 2014

I am very sorry this post was supposed to be published tomorrow. Unfortunately I am still trying to get to grips with WordPress and scheduling posts. My apologies  Rachel x